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The Bradner Lab


Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Harvard Medical School

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The Bradner Lab


Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Harvard Medical School

The Bradner Laboratory is developing insights, creating molecules and establishing therapeutic strategies to control gene expression in cancer. Toward these goals we have assembled as a highly collaborative, interdisciplinary group of scientists that innovate solutions using chemistry, biology, biochemistry and computer science. Our scientific objectives are to understand pathways of gene regulation, to create technologies that accelerate cancer research and to translate these ideas as curative cancer therapeutic strategies. Our mission is to train young scientists at the intersection of these fields and to deliver on the promise of targeted therapy in cancer, while exemplifying an open-source model of basic research and therapeutic discovery.

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Research Highlight


Research Highlight


May 21, 2015.  

A new paper from our laboratory describes a solution to a longstanding challenge in drug discovery – a chemical strategy to induce targeted protein degradation. Online today at Science, we report a generalizable all-chemical strategy to bind and destroy target cancer proteins.  We have created chemical "degronimids" that hijack a cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase (a professional protein degrading machine).  By attaching these degronimids to drugs, we can direct degradation of a desired protein target in a highly potent and selective manner.  A lead compound (dBET1) is described that efficiently degrades nearly all target BET bromodomains in under two hours, leading to a striking therapeutic benefit in models of leukemia.

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Open-Source


To accelerate cancer research, we work to exemplify an open-source strategy in drug discovery. 

Open-Source


To accelerate cancer research, we work to exemplify an open-source strategy in drug discovery. 

Open-source drug discovery (TED 2011)